Modernizing Canadian Grain Sector

Grains-2

Changes to Canada’s Grain Industry Act were introduced last month in the House of Commons by the Government of Canada. These changes will enhance Canadian grain quality and grain safety assurance, as well as increase protection for Canadian grain producers. This Bill will continue to modernize the Canadian grain industry, ensuring international grain importers are receiving top quality grain using the most effective processes possible.

Changes are to make the monitoring of grain safety more consistent throughout Canada. It will also allow for more effective enforcements of violations under the Canada Grain Act, Canada Grain Regulations and orders issued by the Canadian Grain Commission (CGC).

The CGC is the federal agency responsible for establishing and maintaining Canada’s grain quality standards and regulating the grain handling process to provide a reliable product for domestic and export markets.

Grain safety includes monitoring, research and testing grain for toxic substances. These amendments to the Canada Grain Act will further ensure to purchasers of Canadian grain that it is a safe commodity, free of contamination.

Candian Grain ExporterThe amendments would also allow the CGC to build a compensation fund for producers that would protect them if a licensee fails to pay for grain deliveries. The access producers have for determining grade and dockage for deliveries will now include process elevators, grain dealers and more container loading facilities. Furthermore, container loading facilities will have a new class of license, which will be brought under producer payment protection programs. All of these improvements will enhance the Canadian grain export process and benefit international customers.

“Canadian grain farmers drive our economy and this is one of the many ways we are modernizing the sector to make it more competitive. This legislation will continue to modernize the organizations that support the Canadian grain sector and enhance Canada’s excellent reputation around the world as a supplier of consistent, safe and high-quality grains.” – Agriculture Minister Gerry Ritz.

This Bill is to build upon amendments that were made to the Canada Grain Act in October 2012 as part of the Jobs and Growth Act. The 2012 changes were the first changes to be made in over 40 years, streamlined the operations of the CGC and eliminated unnecessary costs to Canadian grain producers.

“We are helping our farmers and the grain industry continue to fuel our economy and remain competitive both at home and abroad,” said Ritz in 2012. “Through these changes, the Harper Government is delivering on its commitment to modernize the grain sector and grow Canada’s competitive advantage, which will boost the economy for all Canadians.”

The changes introduced last month are part of the Government’s commitment to the Canadian grain sector. They hope to enhance regulatory modernization, investments in science and research and trade and market access.

Exporters of Quality Canadian Grain

Barr-AG is an exporter of Canadian Grains to countries around the globe. Canadian grains including oats, barley, wheat and oil seed crops such as flax and canola, are all either produced on a Barr-AG farm or purchased and stored (from Canadian Farmers) and then exported Internationally.

Canadian Grains Grains-1

Barr-Ag and our local network of Canadian Farm Producers all follow our growing protocols and adhere to our quality control standards. All of our grains, oil seeds and pulse crops are non-GMO.

CONTACT US to inquire about purchasing Canadian grain and availability.

 

Sources:
http://news.gc.ca/web/article-en.do?nid=913119
http://news.gc.ca/web/article-en.do?nid=702119,
http://www.grainscanada.gc.ca/quality-qualite/gs-sg-eng.htm

U.S. Alfalfa Hay Exports Contaminated

LocationChina

China has rejected alfalfa hay from the United States due to genetically modified forage contamination. Hay exported from our southern neighbours is in quarantine after detection of GMO traits showed up.

Cross contamination from nearby fields growing Roundup Ready alfalfa, developed by Forage Genetics International for Monsanto Co., is the culprit. This genetically modified alfalfa hay was deregulated by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) in 2011 and caused a lot of controversy. Many feared it would have a negative effect on the export of forage products from North America as the international marketplace does not want genetically modified hay.

All imports to China are supposed to be GMO-free. This could cause China to avoid purchasing US grown hay entirely as they are not interested in feeding their livestock RoundUp Ready. Fortunately, the Western Canadian production of GMO-free alfalfa hay is still safe and free of all RoundUp Ready traits. Customers from overseas can be confident that the GMO-free alfalfa hay from Canadian growers like Barr-Ag has no trace of genetic modifications or any traits that come with it.

A spokesperson from the USDA stated that the organization has been working with authorities and U.S. alfalfa growers to find out why imported hay is coming up with GM traits after being through China’s genetically engineered testing. They want to find out why this ‘certified’ forage came up positive for GM traits and come to an agreement.

“The current threshold of acceptance is 5% GMO by Chinese importers, but this could be tightened to 0.2%, and growers would be hard pressed to meet these standards with unintended cross-pollination along with the shady practices of GM companies who often grow ‘test’ fields of GM crops without regulatory approval.” – Natural Society article

China refused shipments of U.S. grown corn this past summer. The Chinese were concerned that the product contained a genetically modified strain call MIR 162. According to an article from Farm Futures the corn did indeed contain large traces MIR 162. The rejection of this corn cost at least $1 billion to the export economy.

It seems that China has no problem rejecting GM products from the United States. In fact, they even incinerated 3 massive shipments of GM produce from the United States. A passionate journalist shares his thoughts on China vs. Monsanto in this article.

Barr-Ag is proud to offer pure GMO-free alfalfa hay and other products that are far from potential contamination. Learn more about our Canadian grown alfalfa hay.

Alfalfa-Hay

 

 

Sources:

http://hayandforage.com/alfalfa/alfalfa-rejected-export-gmo-contaminated

http://farmfutures.com/story-ngfa-chinas-mir-162-rejection-has-significant-impact-grain-sector-0-111508

http://naturalsociety.com/gm-alfalfa-found-hay-exports-china/

Learning About Canadian Forage

Cutting canadian forage

Canadian forage has a good reputation

Canada is the premier supplier of hay, straw and other forage domestically and internationally. According to the Canadian Forage and Grassland Association, Canada exports approximately 600,000 tonnes of forage annually. This Canadian growth forage is valued at about $150 million and is shipped primarily to the Asia and the United States. Recently, markets for Canadian forage have started to emerge in parts of Mexico and the Middle East.

The Canadian Prairies have developed a good reputation for producing high quality forage such as Timothy and Alfalfa hay. Clean air, long warm days, cool nights and soil rich in calcium and magnesium all contribute to ideal growing conditions.

In an article published in Country Guide, Glenn Friesen of Manitoba Agriculture, Food, and Rural Development commented that these growing conditions are conducive to producing forages that increase animal performance.

High Quality Forage Dairy CowsFeeding your cattle high quality forage is essential for weight gain, producing higher levels of milk, and increasing reproduction success. In the end, all of these things add up to increasing profits for the cattle producer. For Canadian forage producers, this means keeping domestic and international customers happy.

Learning About Canadian Forage

Forages are plants used to feed livestock and can include Alfalfa hay, Timothy hay, pasture and browse plants, cereals and straw. In Canada, forages are the basis of our livestock industry. They also help conserve the rich soil as they add nitrogen to the soil and crop rotations improve the overall soil structure.

Alfalfa-HayAlfalfa hay is considered the one of the best quality forages available in the market and it is the most widely grown in Canada. Farmers from Asia and the United States purchase Canadian alfalfa for their dairy cattle and horses. It will grow under most conditions, can be adapted to many different climatic regions and does especially well in Western Canada.

The quality of the forage is dependent on the following factors:

  • Management of the soil
  • Nutrient composition
  • Seeding rates
  • Timing of cutting, raking and baling
  • Storage of the forage

Young forage is higher in protein and energy that older flowering forage, which is why cutting it at the right time is crucial to its quality.

Purchasing Canadian Forage

Barr-Ag Hay & Grain Exporters are positioned near the eastern slopes of the Canadian Rocky Mountains, a location that provides a pristine environment for growing quality hay and other forages.  Among our most sought after products are Timothy hay, alfalfa hay, mixed hay, oaten hay, sweet hay, as well as various straws and our Canadian Grain Exports.

Unlike crops grown in countries with longer growing seasons and milder climates, our harsh Canadian winters help us to raise our hay crops using more natural methods. There is little to no need for pesticides and herbicides because prolonged cold weather acts as a natural pesticide and herbicide.

Because of the shorter growing season we get 1 or 2 cuttings in a season thereby giving the land ample time to rest and rejuvenate without excessive use of fertilizers. The availability of high quality hay, forage and grain, as well as Barr-Ag’s crop production methods are two reasons our customers have sought us out and helped make us Canada’s leading exporter of hay and forage.

To purchase Canadian forage contact Barr-Ag today!

Sources: http://www.country-guide.ca/2014/03/25/putting-prairie-forages-on-americas-stage/43638/

http://www.agr.gc.ca/eng/industry-markets-and-trade/statistics-and-market-information/by-product-sector/crops/pulses-and-special-crops-canadian-industry/forage/?id=1174594338500

Canadian Grain Storage Systems

By Ammodramus (Own work) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

By Ammodramus (Own work) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Record breaking Canadian grain crop yields and last year’s transport delays have sparked a greater interest and concern for grain storage options. Grain storage is a huge investment for Canadian farmers, but in order to keep up with growing farms and increased market demand for Canadian grain, older storage systems need to be updated.

Alberta Agriculture and Rural Development recently put together two fact sheets to help farmers make an informed decision regarding grain storage solutions. These sheets weigh out the pros and cons of each option by looking at cost comparisons including repairs and maintenance, different types of permanent and temporary storage systems as well as the size of each farm’s operation and requirements.

The two new fact sheets are Grain Storage: Cost Comparisons and Grain Storage Considerations.

The length of time a grain can be safely stored depends on the condition it was harvested and the type of storage facility. Low moisture content and low temperature in storage is essential for successful storage of grain and will prevent it from deteriorating, especially over longer periods of time. Other serious issues that can occur by faulty grain temperature or moisture content include a presence or increase of insects, mice, mold and fungi.

Depending on their operation, Canadian grain growers choose between permanent and temporary grain storage options. Permanent storage including affixed structures like corrugated or smooth walled steel bins, steel or fabric sheds, and farmer owned elevators. Temporary storage could include grain bagging systems, grain rings and tarps, bunkers or even open piles if the crop will be moved after a very short period of time.

Jennifer Stoby, a provincial market analyst for agriculture inputs commented on bins versus grain baggers in an article published in the Alberta Farm Express. She shared that operations need to store more than 70,000 bushels of grain per year to make the grain bagger option more competitive than steel bins. These findings can be reviewed in the Grain Storage: Cost Comparisons fact sheet.

Selling Grain in Western Canada

Canadian farmers looking to sell their grain crops can contact Barr-Ag. As wholesale buyers of Canadian farm crops we will buy locally produced oats, barley, wheat, flax, canola and pulse crops as well as Alfalfa and Timothy hays. Barr-Ag specializes in containerizing, loading and shipping Canadian grains to our extensive database of international purchasers.

Deciding on a brand new grain storage system could be made easier if you had a reliable buyer for your quality grain, oilseed and hay crops. Call Barr-Ag today to get a market price for your crop.

 

Sources:

http://www1.agric.gov.ab.ca/$department/deptdocs.nsf/all/crop1204

http://www1.agric.gov.ab.ca/$department/deptdocs.nsf/all/sis15018

http://www1.agric.gov.ab.ca/$department/deptdocs.nsf/all/sis15016

http://www.albertafarmexpress.ca/2014/09/25/the-bottom-line-on-grain-storage/?module=under-carousel&pgtype=homepage

Timothy Hay: Processing and Export

Timothy hay grows extremely well in Western Canada’s growing conditions. The clean air, rich soil and cooperative climate all contribute to the production of some of the most palatable hay in the world. Since this Timothy hay is grown at higher altitudes, with long warm summer days and cool nights during the growing season, it matures with an increased sugar content and makes excellent forage for livestock.

Canadian Timothy hay and other forages are in demand in Japan and other countries along the Pacific Rim. It is used as forage for beef and dairy cattle, as well as in the horse industry in certain parts of Asia. It’s a nutritious source of fibre, encourages growth and is beneficial to livestock producers who do not have the land or the means to grow it locally. As a result, the export market for Canadian hay has expanded rapidly.

Canadian hay growers see hay processors and exporters like Barr-Ag as their consumer. They will sell their crops to a local exporter, where the Timothy hay is compressed and processed for shipment. The true customer is the export market. Canadian hay growers who want access to the export market should contact a hay processor to learn about market demands, specific standards for raw material and the preference of the international customer. .

Product quality is incredibly important when trying to sell your crops to a hay processor and exporter. Shipping products like Timothy hay such large distances is very expensive. In order to ensure the needs and expectations of the international customer are met, a hay processor must hold a high standard for the hay it chooses to purchase, process and export.

In regards to Timothy hay, the end-user is looking for long, course stems with long heads. The stems should be green, leafy and have a minimum of brown leaves. It should be free of mold, weeds, or other plant species and contaminants. It must have a low moisture content to ensure mold and moisture damage doesn’t occur during transport or storage.

Processing the crop into compressed bales can reduce shipping costs. Timothy hay can be compressed or even double compressed to better fit into transportation containers. They are usually transported by truck to a container yard, then picked up by rail and moved to a Canadian port. If the hay is going to Asia it will be moved to a port in Vancouver, shipments going to Europe travel to Montreal, and shipments going to the United States are transported via Chicago and/or Fort Lauderdale. From these ports they’re loaded on ocean container ships and sent to overseas markets.

 

In order to ship Timothy hay to international markets the hay exporter must obtain a Phytosanitary Certificate. This is the official document issued by the plant protection organization of the exporting country to the plant protection organization of the importing country. It makes sure the product has been inspected, free of quarantine pests, and cleared according to specific regulations of the country receiving the shipment.

Some markets do not hold as strict standards as Japan. If the baled Timothy hay does not meet Japanese requirements it can be sold to residual markets such as Korea or Taiwan. A hay processor can also market single-compressed hay in the USA, Europe, the Caribbean and Middle East as they each have different requirements and may accept a variety of Canadian hay products.

For more information on selling your Canadian grown Timothy hay, contact Barr-Ag.  If you’re interested in importing Canadian forage, click on the image and fill our the request form.

hay

More Canadian Grain Transported During Autumn Harvest

Canadian grain producers yielded 50 percent more crop than average last growing season. This incredible yield combined with a long and brutal winter, put major pressure on the handling and transportation system, causing the system to slow significantly. This resulted in changes made to the Canada Transportation Act and the Canada Grain Act. These changes created regulations for Canadian railways, obligating them to ship at least 500,000 tonnes of grain per week and issue weekly reports.  This legislation is called Fair Rail for Grain Farmers Act and was introduced in the early spring.

“CP RAIL TBAY” by Eja2k Licensed under Public domain -Wikimedia Commons

This growing season is shaping up to be as productive and experts are predicting it could be the second largest yield on record. In order to prevent another back log, the Canadian government has announced new regulations that will require the both Canadian National (CN) and Canadian Pacific (CP) railways to ship more than their combined 1 million tonnes of grain, extending into the autumn harvest.

Starting in early August and lasting until November 29th, both railways must each more 536,250 tonnes of crops each week. If they fail to do so they could face a penalty of $100,000 per violation.

The government deems this action necessary in order to preserve the integrity of Canada’s transportation system and its reputation as a global supplier of Canadian grain. These new regulations are hoped to increase efficiencies, strengthen relationships between Canadian grain exporters and their international customers.

Last year, billions of dollars worth of crops was left on farms during the winter. Although CP and CN picked up the pace in the spring and summer, left over grains from last growing season were still estimated 20.9 million tonnes as of last month, according to Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada.

These regulations will make it easier for Canadian grain producers to deliver crops to buyers. The railway companies are able to conduct interswitching in more parts of Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba. This means that they will be able to transfer cars from one railway’s line to the line of the other, creating more efficiencies in the handling and transportation process.

Canadian Grain Exporters

Barr-Ag Hay and Grain Exporters are always looking for opportunities to better serve our customers overseas, providing them with the high-quality Canadian grain they require.  This new legislation will help move our Canadian crops from the eastern slopes of the Canadian Rockies to international shipping ports and to our customers in a timely manner.

Grains from Canada

 

Sources: https://finance.yahoo.com/news/canada-extends-railway-grain-volume-160010925.html

http://www.albertafarmexpress.ca/daily/feds-extend-railway-grain-volume-rules-through-harvest

http://news.gc.ca/web/article-en.do?nid=829579

Spring Price Endorsement for Canadian Farmers

Canadian Canola

Canadian farmers have several options for insurance to protect the price of new crop canola. The Spring Price Endorsement is a price risk management tool, purchased as an endorsement on a crop specific basis. It will pay out if market prices decline below a determined level on actual production on a crop specific basis, according to a ‘within year’ price decline up to the coverage purchased.

Earlier this spring, Agriculture and Rural Development Alberta issued a press release reminding Canadian canola farmers of this option.

“The 2014 canola spring price under the AFSC Spring Price Endorsement (SPE) is $9.75/bushel,” says Neil Blue, market specialist, Alberta Agriculture and Rural Development, Vermilion. “A payout under the SPE would be triggered if the fall price drops by more than 10 per cent (i.e., 97 ½ cents/bushel) from this spring price. If the calculated fall price is below $8.77 ½ /bushel, there will be a payout under the Spring Price Endorsement.”

Blue continued to explain that the overall payout would equal spring price for Canadian canola of $9.75/bushel minus the fall price X crop insurance coverage in bushels. The Spring Price Endorsement (SPE) is limited to 50% of the price drop from the spring price ($9.75) or $4.88/bushel for 2014. The fall price for canola in 2014 is calculated by finding the average of the daily closing prices for ICE Futures Canada November canola during the month of October, then subtracting $20/tonne from that number. Prices less than $406.90/tonne in October would trigger a payout under the SPE.

It’s important for Canadian canola farmers to obtain all the information from the different pricing options, considering their costs of production, estimated crop carry-over, storage capacity, potential production and other financial needs. Keeping an eye on the current marketing environment and using different pricing alternatives will help farmers ‘spread out’ the pricing risks on this year’s crop.

“It may be prudent in the current crop marketing environment to use several different pricing alternatives to distribute the pricing risks of your upcoming crop,” Blue adds.

Looking for a Buyer for Your Canola and Other Crops?

Canadian hay truckBarr-AG Hay and Grain Exporters will buy your Canadian canola, oats, barley, wheat, flax, and pulse crops as well as Alfalfa and Timothy Hays.  We specialize in containerizing, loading & shipping Canadian grains and hays and we’re major wholesale purchaser of Canadian Farm Crops.

We offer Canadian grain growers the opportunity to sell their crops locally.  We have a good reputation and wide customer base in the international market, with years of experience producing and selling Canadian grains and hays overseas.  We have a huge database of reliable international purchasers who are in the market for Canadian canola and other oil seeds as well as grains and hay forages.

If you have a crop coming in and are looking for a market to sell your crop – Call Barr-AG today to get a market price on your crop.

Grains from Canada

Sources:  http://www1.agric.gov.ab.ca/$department/newslett.nsf/all/agnw22124

http://www.albertafarmexpress.ca/2014/05/26/many-ways-to-protect-the-price-of-your-canola-crop/

http://www.afsc.ca/doc.aspx?id=5530

Timothy Seed

Canadian Timothy Hay

Timothy seed is most produced in Western Canada, specifically Alberta and Manitoba.  Although much of the product is used throughout North America, some varieties are grown and shipped to international markets.  Timothy hay readily produces the seed and it can be harvested for seed as well as for forage.

The price of timothy seed is affected by the supply of seed producers in western Canada and the market demand.  International demand for Canadian timothy seed comes mostly from the USA and European countries.  Seed prices are also affected by the yield of timothy hay produced and sold for forage.  In years where overall hay production for forage was low due to weather conditions or other factors, the fields can still be harvested for the seed.

Timothy Seed in the Marketplace

Growers of Canadian timothy hay and seed have several options for marketing their crops.  Canadian growers can choose to sell into the cash market or grow under contract from an international buyer.  Alberta Agriculture and Rural Development mentions two options for contracting timothy seed: forward priced or production contracts.

Forward pricing is when the grower is contracted to grow and deliver a certain amount and grade of seed at a specific date.  Depending on the contract, the seller could pay the shipping and handling costs.  Then the seed company will pay a certain price depending on the quality and grade of timothy seed.

A production contract is signed between a grower and seed company when the grower agrees to produce a specific variety of seed from a certain growing area.  A specific price is set, but if the seed does not meet the quality as outlined in the contract upon delivery the price to the grower can be reduced.  Most production contracts are for certified production.  That means that a field inspection is completed and the timothy seed is registered and certified.  One benefit to Canadian growers entering into a production contract is that they are guaranteed a minimum price for their crop, offering a small amount of protection in a sometimes unpredictable marketplace.

Varieties of Timothy Seed

There are many varieties of timothy seed on the marketplace.  The most common variety grown by Canadian producers is Climax, which was developed by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada.  Varieties that are more commonly exported to Europe are usually grown under production contract with seed companies.

Here is a list of available timothy seed varieties grown in Western Canada:  Alma, Basho, Bottnia II, Bounty, Champ, Climax, Comtal, Hokuo, Itasca, Rasant, Richmond, Tiiti, Tiller, and Timfor.

Important Factors for Growing Timothy Seed

Field selection is very important and must meet a number of requirements.  The field must be a certain distant from other fields growing different timothy varieties and that are free of perennial weeds.  Timothy hay is tolerant to flooding so it will actually grow well in a poorly drained field.  It’s also important to know the history of herbicides previously used on the field and if any remaining residues will affect the crop.

Timothy is a small seed and must be planted shallow into a firm seedbed at about two pounds of seed per acre.

Establishing stand, row spacing, and fertility will help growers decide on in-crop herbicides and pesticides.  Timothy hay is a very sensitive crop and herbicide selection must be done considering the weeds present, the amount of stress the crop is already under, stage of the timothy and rotation of herbicides.

Fortunately, well established timothy stands are not affected by insect pests.  Newer stands might could see grasshoppers, wireworm or cutworms most likely because these pests were already in the field when it was planted.  Keeping a close eye on moisture levels will help the new crop tolerate damage created by feeding insects.

 

Sources: 

http://www.brettyoung.ca/images/file/BY_Seed%20Prod%20Guide.pdf

http://www1.agric.gov.ab.ca/$department/deptdocs.nsf/all/agdex8696?opendocument

http://seedgrowers.ca/seed-growers/regulations/

Canadian Grain Exporters Benefit from Fair Rail for Grain Farmers Act

picLast growing season western Canadian grain farmers produced 50% more crop than average, yielding about 76 million tonnes of Canadian grain.  That heavy yield, combined with a long and extremely cold winter, has put significant pressure on the handling and transportation system, slowing it down.  In an effort to maintain Canada’s reputation as a world supplier of grain to international markets, and to move more grain through the transportation system, Transport Canada and Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada came together to announce a plan of action.  This plan included setting regulations for the Canadian railway companies, enhancing monitoring, research and marketing programs for the grain sector.

Agriculture Minister Gerry Ritz and Transport Minister Lisa Raitt introduced the Fair Rail for Grain Farmers Act in Parliament in late March.  This new legislation will make changes to the Canada Transportation Act and the Canada Grain Act, aiming to get more grain to market quickly in response to last year’s record crop year for Canadian grain producers.  New regulations are hoped to increase efficiencies in the grain handling and transportation system, strengthen contracts between producers and shippers and increase transparency in the supply change.

“For the past several months, the bumper crop of grain produced in Canada has not been moving fast enough to Canadian ports. This issue affects more than just our farmers – it affects trade and Canada’s ability to supply our markets around the world. We are taking this action to more than double grain shipments in order to preserve the integrity of Canada’s transportation system and our reputation as a global supplier.”  The Honourable Lisa Raitt Minister of Transport

The Order in Council announced in early March obligates the Canadian National (CN) and Canadian Pacific (CP) railways to increase their capacity to carry at least 500,000 metric tonnes of grain per week.  The two rail companies are also obligated to report on the volume of grain moved each week so the overall performance of grain movement can be analyzed in a more timely matter.  This came in effect on April 7th, 2014.  CN and CP face a penalty of up to $100,000 per day if they fail to comply.  Proposed legislation extends these requirements to August 3, but as it stands they are only imposed until June 7th, 2014.

Storm clouds over Saskatchewan grain terminal

These changes will also extend the limits for inter-switching.  Currently producers are able to switch their goods from one rail to another, at a fee, if they are within 30km of an interchange.  With the Fair Rail for Grain Farmers Act, this range will be extended to 160km.  This means that the number of grain elevators with access to both railways moves from about 14 elevators to 150 elevators within multi-service radius.  This will greatly increase the amount of Canadian grain moved and assist in response to the incredible yield and the growing world market.

“Farmers and our economy need a system that works today and tomorrow, with the capacity to move what is grown.”  Agriculture Minister Gerry Ritz

The Government of Canada has taken other steps to help improve the performance of the entire rail supply chain.  The Grain Monitoring Program will be enhanced to include more frequent reporting in order to expand the quality and quantity of data collected.  The Government is investing $1.5 million, matched by industry, in a Pulse Canada-led project of the pulse, oilseeds and grains industries in order to improve efficiencies and overall supply.  They’re also investing over $73.6 million in grain research and implementing marketing freedom for western Canadian wheat and barley growers.

For those seeking to export Canadian grain, this is positive news.  Barr-Ag Hay and Grain Exporters are always looking for opportunities to better serve our customers overseas, providing them with the high-quality Canadian grain they require.  This new legislation will help move our fantastic Canadian crops from the eastern slopes of the Canadian Rockies to international shipping ports and to our customers in a timely manner.

Grains from Canada

 

Sources:  http://news.gc.ca/web/article-en.do?mthd=advSrch&crtr.page=2&crtr.dpt1D=6695&nid=822889

http://news.gc.ca/web/article-en.do?nid=829579

http://www.realagriculture.com/2014/03/fair-rail-grain-farmers-act-aimed-getting-grain-moving/

Canadian Hay Certification Program

Canadian HayCanadian hay that is exported to international markets goes through the Canadian Hay Certification Program (CHCP).  This allows approved facilities like Barr-Ag to export Canadian hay that meets requirements for foreign phytosanitary import and is issued a Phytosanitary Certificate.

A Phytosanitary Certificate ensures that the hay has been inspected according to the required procedures and makes sure the product is free from quarantine pests, practically free from injurious pests and conforms to the regulations of the importing country.

In the 1980’s the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) teamed up with the Canadian hay industry to develop the CHCP.  The market for exporting Canadian hay was experiencing considerable growth and there was a need for phytosanitary certification to ensure quality control as more and more compressed, baled hay was being exported from Canada to international markets.

Approved processors and exporters of Canadian hay must go through the CHCP and meet the specific phytosanitary import requirements of each importing country.  To be approved as a certified hay processing facility, a facility must apply to the CFIA with a quality management system in place.

Quality Management System

The CHCP requires processing facilities like Barr-Ag to create and execute a Quality Management System.  This system includes, but is not limited to:

  • Creating a Quality Management System Manual outlining specific quality management procedures that must be followed.
  • Employee training program
  • Quality control protocol
  • Hay examination
  • Audit procedures

A proper Quality Management System will make certain that the product imported from a Canadian hay processing facility meets phytosanitary standards and follows required regulations throughout the processing procedures including quality control, storage, and shipping.

Canadian Hay Eligible for Certification

The following Canadian hay forages are eligible for certification:

If you are looking to purchase a different species of hay from Canada, the CFIA must verify the acceptability of the species to the importing country.

Review the Canadian Hay Certification Program Standards

International importers of Canadian hay are able to review the minimum standards that must be met by all approved processing facilities in Canada.  Documentation is available that outlines proper quality management systems, the process of conducting hay examinations for the purpose of CFIA certification, and administrative activities required of them by the CHCP.

Review the Canadian Hay Certification Program documents.

Barr-Ag processing facility in Arrowwood, AB.

Barr-Ag’s processing facility in Arrowwood, AB.

Quality Control – Canada’s Leading Exporter of Hay & Forage

At Barr-Ag, we keep a close watch on every aspect of our production, from growing conditions and harvest through to storage, processing and shipping.  Barr-Ag is approved by the CFIA and Phytosanitary Certificates are issued.

Barr-Ag is only as successful as our customer satisfaction; our customers have helped make us Canada’s leading exporter of hay and forage.

Contact Barr-Ag if you have specific questions about our hay and forage or want to place an order.

Sources:  

http://www.inspection.gc.ca/plants/exports/phytosanitary-certificates/eng/1299872808479/1299872974262

http://www.inspection.gc.ca/eng/1297964599443/1297965645317